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July Articles 2018

Foot Pain

Our feet are arguably the most important parts of our bodies because they are responsible for getting us from place to place.  However, we often don’t think about our feet until they begin to hurt. If you have pain in your feet, you need to first determine where on the foot you are experiencing it to get to the root of the problem. The most common areas to feel pain on the foot are the heel and the ankle.

Heel pain is most commonly attributed to a condition called plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia, which is the band of tough tissue connecting the heel bone to the toes becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis pain is usually worse in the morning, and it tends to go away throughout the day. If you have plantar fasciitis, you should rest your foot and do heel and foot muscles stretches. Wearing shoes with proper arch support and a cushioned sole has also been proven to be beneficial.

Some common symptoms of foot pain are redness, swelling, and stiffness. Foot pain can be dull or sharp depending on its underlying cause. Toe pain can also occur, and it is usually caused by gout, bunions, hammertoes, ingrown toenails, sprains, fractures, and corns.

If you have severe pain in your feet, you should immediately seek assistance from your podiatrist for treatment. Depending on the cause of your pain, your podiatrist may give you a variety of treatment options.

 

Toenail Fungus

For many people, toenail fungus can be not only unsightly but also embarrassing. The condition is frustrating as it can be very persistent and difficult to get rid of. Fortunately, there are many available treatment options for toenail fungus.

Lamisil is the most effective treatment for toenail fungus though any anti-fungal treatment can be used. Look for the ingredient terbinafine when it comes to products that focus on killing fungal growth. Utilizing a product containing terbinafine will damage the cell membrane of the fungus organism even though the results are not immediate. Apply the medication on a routine basis and be sure to wash and dry the affected area thoroughly. The fungus requires air, moisture, and your skin to live.

It may also help to take other precautions when it comes to fungal nails. Applying talcum powder inside shoes can absorb sweat and moisture. Also, be sure to wear sandals or loose-fitting, open-toed shoes which can improve air-flow around the feet and keep them dry. These types of shoes also expose your feet to light, which is not favorable for fungus growth. Wear socks that dry quickly and wick moisture can also help control fungal growth.

Though Lamisil and other terbinafine-based medications are effective, they may also cause a variety of undesirable side effects. If this kind of medication does not sync with you, there are several natural remedies to try. Regular applications of tea tree oil, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol or Vicks VapoRub to the affected area may also solve the problem.

Your physician can also recommend soaking your toenails in a gentle bleach solution, with anecdotal evidence suggests that Listerine and vinegar are possible effective soaking solutions. They may be simple treatments but require consistency and of course patience. Your local pharmacy may also carry topical products manufactured specifically for toenail fungus.

Laser surgery is a more immediate treatment if you are looking for a quick removal of the toenail fungus. However, do not cut the toenail fungus using any kind of scissors, even toenail scissors. It should be advised that once your fungus infection is cured, you will need to throw out old pairs of shoes to avoid reinfection.

 

Wound Care

Diabetics must be wary of all wounds, regardless of depth or size. Diabetes, a chronic disease in which the body cannot properly use glucose the way it normally would, causes various complications that make wounds difficult to heal. Nerve damage or neuropathy will cause diabetics to have trouble feeling the pain of a blister or cut until the condition has significantly worsened or become infected. A diabetic’s weakened immune system can make even the most minor of wounds easily susceptible to infection. Diabetics are also more prone to developing narrow, clogged arteries, and are therefore more likely to develop wounds.

Wounds should be taken care of immediately after discovery, as even the smallest of wounds can become infected if enough bacteria build up within the wound.  To remove dirt, wounds should be first rinsed under running water only. Soap, hydrogen peroxide, or iodine can irritate the injury and should be avoided. To prevent infection, apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover it with a bandage. The bandage should be changed daily. The skin around the wound may be cleaned with soap.

To prevent further exacerbation, see a doctor—especially if you have diabetes. Minor skin conditions can become larger problems if not properly inspected. As the wound heals, make sure to avoid applying pressure to the affected area.

 

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition that affects the joint that is just behind the big toe in the area known as the ball of the foot. It is most common in younger people and people who have just begun an exercise program. Since the sesamoid bones are like a pulley controlling the big toe, they can rub against each other and cause pain. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. If ignored, sesamoiditis can lead to other, more serious problems such as severe irritation and fractures of the bones.

The cause of sesamoiditis is sudden increase in activity. The ball of your foot acts as a springboard to help you lift off when you are jogging or running. Sudden increase in the use of these bones or the tendon that controls them can cause irritation. The tendon then begins to develop inflammation and the joint begins to swell. People with smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch are typically more susceptible to this condition.

Sesamoiditis is simple to diagnose since the symptoms have a gradual onset rather than a sudden impact. The symptoms begin with slight irritation around the joint shortly after the increase in activity. The discomfort eventually turns to pain with light swelling and possible redness. Although redness or bruising is rare, either may occur. After each session of exercising, the aggravated joint becomes more irritated and can exacerbate into intense throbbing.

Treatment for sesamoiditis can vary depending on the severity of the condition. However, treatment for sesamoiditis is almost always approached in a noninvasive way. For a case that is just beginning, the doctor may recommend a very strict rest period that will limit activity and stress on the joint. If you are active, a recommendation for a modified shoe or insole along with bandaging and immobilizing the big toe will be made to ensure that pressure is not placed on the joint. For severe cases, it is usually recommended that the joint and the big toe be completely immobilized to allow adequate time to heal. Ice and over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications can help with the pain and discomfort while you are at rest.

When you return to your regular exercise activities, it is recommended that you use an insole that will allow for even distribution of impact to your entire foot, rather than just the ball of your foot. This will prevent further aggravation of the condition.